Saturday, July 21, 2007

Scary News

Tyler's Mom here: I came home yesterday and found a message on my anwsering machine. it was from my vet, who had seen Jake on Monday. He said that he had been thinking about Jake and wondered if he'd been tested for FeLV and FIV at the SPCA. (Where I had adopted him.) I thught the question strange. I'm thinking he must have been tested, with all those cats, they must be tested for both. I'd never put my own cats at risk by bringing an untested cat home. When I found

Wrong! On the last page of the packet I received with Jake says the following. "Cats available for adoption at the shelter are not routinely tested for FeLV and FIV. We recommend that you have your adopted cat tested by your veterinarian. Keep your new cat separate from your cats at home until you have the testing done."

Now I'm angry. Jake has been here over a month. I was given a separate computer generated sheet that told me what exactly I needed to do next for my boyWhen I found Sophie on the street, I wouldn't take her home until I found a vet who would test her right away. I just can't understand why it wouldn't be routine testing. Don't they want to prevent the spreading of these diseases? Do they see the animals as disposible as a paper plate?
Tyler's Mom here: I came home yesterday and found a message on my answering machine it was from my vet, who had seen Jake on Monday. He said that he had been thinking about Jake and wondered if he'd been tested for FeLV and FIV at the SPCA. (Where I had adopted him.) I thought the question strange. I was thinking he must have been tested, with all those cats, they must be tested for both diseases. I'd never put my own cats at risk by bringing an untested cat home.

Wrong! On the last page of a stapled packet I received with Jake says the following. "Cats available for adoption at the shelter are not routinely tested for FeLV and FIV. We recommend that you have your adopted cat tested by your veterinarian. Keep your new cat separate from your cats at home until you have the testing done."

Now I'm angry. Jake has been here over a month. I was given a separate computer generated sheet that told me what exactly I needed to do next for my boy, at the vets and at home. When I found Sophie on the street, I wouldn't take her home until I found a vet who would test her right away. I just can't understand why it wouldn't be routine testing. Don't they want to prevent the spreading of these diseases? Do they see the animals as disposable as a paper plate?

I didn't read the paperwork until midnight last night. My vet has walk-in hours without appointments today for three hours starting in 45 mins. I didn't sleep for more than an hour total last night, worrying.

I"am also angry at myself for assuming that the tests were given. I know better than to trust blindly anyone or any group of people. If he's sick, I am going to have a hard time forgiving myself. Ok, let's be positive. The vet said in the taped message that it's rare for a kitten to come in sick. I don't know how long it will be before I have the information. I'll let you all know as soon as I do. Please send positive thoughts our way.

Sleepy-eyed Lynn

6 comments:

Forty Paws said...

The SPCA is probably doing it as a way to save money. If they give the kitten its first set of shots, then they probably only give the FVRCP shot, and then tell you that it will need 2 or 3 more rounds of shots and its rabies shot and the testing? To do the tests, it requires someone who can draw blood, and so if the shelter gives its own shots, then the person might not know how to draw blood.
Also, the FIV test can show up as a False Positive sometimes because the kitten can have enough antibodies from its mom to indicate a positive. Then the kitten needs to be retested in 6 months, which can be a hassle to tell a potential adopter. The group I was with offered to pay for the retest in 6 months to try to assure the adopter that it was likely a false positive.

Not that I approve of your SPCA adopting out animals without a thorough vet exam and testing; just trying to give you scenarios as to maybe why they don't test.

I was in the volunteer rescue area myself for a number of years, and every group operates differently and there is never enough money, and always too many animals.

I'm hoping for the best outcome for you and Jake.

Luf, Maw

Lux said...

Oh gosh - my paws are crossed for you! ~ Lux

Best wishes; I hope all your worry was for nothing,
Luxie's Mom

Daisy said...

Oh dear, that is very upsetting. I am crossing my paws that the test comes out negative. My Mommie volunteers at a cat rescue shelter and they would never adopt out a cat without FeLV and FIV testing. Many of the cats at the shelter come in as stray/abandoned cats, and the great majority do test negative.

Tyler said...

Dear Maw from forty paws,
I understand money being tight. I was imagining a lot of animals being infected because no one was testing and separtating the infected animals. Now that I read that less than 5% of cats get either disease, well I can understand better why their not being tested.

I do wish that they had told me he needed testing as well as written it on the sheet that had his next steps needed listed. I also wished I had been more assertive as to making sure I was following through and meeting his needs

After hearing the percentages, I do feel better. I'm not going to allow myself to worry over this one.

Thanks for your perspective of the situation. You obviously have a view than I and I appreciated reading your thoughts on the matter.
Smiles,
Lynn, Tyler's mom

Dragonheart said...

That is scary! I am sending lots of positive thoughts your way and praying that he checks out fine.

The Crew said...

We agree with 40 Paws. These shelters are usually very underfunded so only do the most basic things to kittens/puppies.

Hopefully when your tests are done, everything will turn out OK.